From the Scoutmaster's Handbook, BSA, 1937

Leading makes use of many skills....


"Leading makes use of many skills...." is adapted from Patrol and Troop Leadership, the handbook on leadership development written for Patrol Leaders and published by the Boy Scouts of America in 1972.

Much of the original leadership development material contained in the Handbook, including the eleven skills of leadership, remain at the core of today's leadership experience in Scouting. Patrol and Troop Leadership covered nine of the skills presented at the Council Junior Leader Training Conference and other leadership development programs in Scouting.

Introduction

Leading makes use of many skills. We are going to take up nine of them here.

These nine skills are important. Many of them intertwine. Some cannot be used alone. If you can improve your skill in each of the nine, you'll improve your effectiveness as a leader.

With each skill, we'll follow this pattern:

  • An example of the skill in use
  • An explanation of the skill
  • A use of the skill
  • How to evaluate whether you are improving in that skill

Notes on the Individual Skills of Leadership

Communicating
Knowing and Using the Resources of the Group
Setting the Example
Representing the Group
Evaluating
Planning
Controlling Group Performance
Sharing Leadership
Effective Teaching

  "Learning About Leadership" is adapted from Patrol and Troop Leadership, the handbook on leadership development written for Patrol Leaders and published by the Boy Scouts of America in 1972. It provides some excellent background and insight into the BSA's approach to the subject of leadership.
     
  From 1990 to 1993, the Junior Leader Training Conference program received an intensive review. A new Junior Leader Training Conference Staff Guide was published in 1993. Comments on the 1995 Revisions takes a close-up look at the most recent changes published in the 1995 printing.
  The Troop Leader Development Staff Guide (1974) presented a short history of leadership development and how elements of the White Stag program were incorporated into the leadership development efforts of the BSA in The Historical Background of Leadership Development
  Since the first experimental leadership development courses at Schiff and Philmont in the 1960's, the National Junior Leader Instructor Camp has set the standards for Junior Leader Training courses in councils across the country. A unique experience in leadership and learning, NJLIC leads the way by providing the most up-to-date training for those junior leaders selected to lead their local council courses.

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Copyright Lewis P. Orans, 1997
Last Modified: 9:37 PM on 4-19-97